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Love 30 has made a submission to the Galway City Council public consultation on speed limits saying that we wholeheartedly welcome the proposals by Galway City Council to reduce speed limits in the city centre and the suggestion that there will be further 30 km/h speed limits.

However, we are disappointed that the 30 km/h speed limit area in the city centre is modest in size and that no proposals were brought forward to introduce 30 km/h speed limits in neighbourhood centres, non-estate residential roads, or outside schools.

Further, we are concerned that the proposals retain or implement new 60, 80 and 100 km/h speed limits on roads with houses, schools, businesses and on roads with known safety issues. Almost all of the roads proposed to have higher speed limits are in Safety Camera (GoSafe) Zones. Exacerbating circumstances include lack of continuous footways and footways with low level of service, lack of cycleways / cyclepaths, lack of safe crossing points and haphazard footways that are overgrown, poorly surfaced and / or covered in road debris. While direct, many of the roads are not straight.

 


 

Dublin City Council also need to hear from you. If you want safer roads and lower speeds, make sure to respond to the Council's survey in support of these changes. It will take less than 5 minutes and can be done on phone or computer.


Proposed special Speed Limit Bye-Laws 2020 (COVID19) Phase 5

Submission by Love 30 Campaign for Lower Speed Limits

August 2020

The Love 30 Campaign is a national alliance of individuals and organisations who support lower speed limits in urban areas. We campaign for the introduction of more 30 km/h zones in urban areas, but particularly in town centres, residential areas, and near schools and other places of public assembly. The Campaign consists of walking groups, cycling campaigners, supporters of children’s right to walk & play, and others who recognise the benefits of lower speed limits.

Our supporters include:

  • UK’s 20's Plenty for Us
  • Dublin Cycling Campaign
  • European Network for 30 km/h
  • Jake’s Legacy
  • Irish Pedestrian Network
  • Phizzfest
  • A Playful City
  • An Taisce
  • An Taisce Green Schools
  • Councillors, TDs, Senators and MEPs from across the political spectrum support the campaign

Love 30 commends Dublin City Council on its proposal to introduce a default speed limit of 30 km/h on all roads in the Dublin City Council administrative area, except roads specifically listed in the bye-laws. We believe that the introduction of the default speed limit of 30 km/h will send a very clear message to all road users that Dublin City is a place where people can move about safely and that motor vehicles must slow down and respect more vulnerable road users. We hope that other Irish cities will follow the exemplary lead being given by Dublin City Council and will introduce default 30 km/h speed limits.

However, we have some concerns about the distributor routes that are proposed to remain at 50 km/h, especially Crumlin Road, where the width of the road should encourage slower speeds. Also, we are conscious that surveys by the City Council and the Road Safety Authority have shown poor compliance with the existing 30 km/h speed limits, especially on non-residential roads. Therefore, we would encourage Dublin City Council to secure funding for implementation of traffic-calming measures that will encourage adherence to the 30 km/h limits.

We are aware that the Programme for Government includes a commitment to ensure greater compliance with speed limits and hope that Dublin City Council will engage with An Garda Síochána to ensure effective enforcement of these new speed limits.

Love 30 welcomes Dublin City Council’s proposal to introduce a default 30 km/h speed limit in the City, hopes that a budget will be secured for appropriate traffic-calming measures and that the new speed limits will be enforced effectively

Mairéad Forsythe,
Love 30 Campaign for lower speed limits


Dublin City Council also need to hear from you. If you want safer roads and lower speeds, make sure to respond to the Council's survey in support of these changes. It will take less than 5 minutes and can be done on phone or computer.

 


 

Would you like to see slower speeds and safer, quieter streets in your area?

Join us for a public Zoom meeting at 8.30pm on Tuesday 7th July to find out more about our national campaign for 30 km/h speed limits on our residential roads, in our city, town & village centres, and outside all our schools.

For Zoom meeting details email info@love30.ie

 


 

We are delighted with the Dublin City Council proposals for more 30 km/h speed limits in the City. The 30 km/h limit already introduced to residential areas will be expanded to include most of the arterial routes, including many urban villages like Phibsborough, Rathmines and Ranelagh.

The proposals also provide for a default 30 km/h speed limit with any higher limits being the exception. This is a paradigm shift from the current bye-laws where the default limit is 50 km/h with 30 km/h considered a “special speed limit”. The default 30 km/h makes Dublin a leader not just nationally, but internationally, as not many European cities have default 30 km/h limits.

A six week period of public consultation begins tomorrow, 2nd of July (finishing on Thursday 13th of August) in order to feedback on the 30km/h speed limit to guage public levels of support and identify if there are any particular barriers to acceptance and compliance. As part of the public consultation process, a public survey has been created which explores public perception of driver behaviour and speed limit compliance. Please complete the survey by 13 August. It only takes about two minutes.

You can also make submissions may be made in writing marked “Speed Limit Review” to the Senior Engineer, Transport Operations, Environment & Transportation Department, Dublin City Council, Civic Offices, Wood Quay, D08 RF3F, or via email to speedreview@dublincity.ie.

We hope other Irish Local Authorities will follow Dublin’s lead. It is hoped to have the new limits in place before the end of 2020.

 


 

Love 30 has made a submission to Fingal County Council in response to its Traffic Calming Scheme Public Consultation

Love 30 has supported Fingal County Council’s proposals to introduce 30 km/h speed limits on residential roads in the County and supported the recent School Streets Initiative in Malahide.

Love 30 welcomes Fingal County Council’s proposed traffic-calming measures. We believe that these measures will help to reinforce the stated speed limits and will encourage drivers to slow down, thus making the roads in question safer and more comfortable for all road users.

We note the proposal to use speed ramps in a number of the locations e.g. Brackenstown Road, Glenville Road and would suggest that additional engineering methods, such as plants, trees, chicanes, etc. could be used to supplement the speed ramps in encouraging drivers to slow down. These measures can create a perception of a narrower road, or suggest a more people-friendly environment, which can encourage drivers to slow down of their own accord, rather than feeling that the lower speed is being forced on them by the ramps.

Love 30 commends Fingal County Council on its efforts to make the roads in the County safer for all road users.

 


 

22 April 2020

The Love30 Campaign has sent the following letter to Shane Ross, the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport asking him to consider the introduction of a 30 km/h speed limit on all urban roads as a way of reducing the burden on our healthcare system.

Dear Minister,

I am writing on behalf of the Love30 Campaign for lower speed limits. We campaign for 30 km/h speed limits in residential areas, in town and village centres, and in the vicinity of schools and places of public assembly. We have met with you in the past, and you have been pro-active in pushing local authorities to reduce vehicle speeds in populated areas, particularly where children are a feature. You will be aware of the dramatic reduction in traffic on our roads during the Covid-19 restrictions. This reduction is in many ways very welcome. Unfortunately, however, some drivers are using the less congested roads as an opportunity to speed up, in many cases exceeding the posted speed limits. These faster speeds can give rise to more deaths and injuries on our roads at a time when we would all wish to reduce the burden on our healthcare system. Healthcare personnel, both here and elsewhere, have appealed to drivers to slow down and these appeals have been supported by the Road Safety Authority. Also, there has been a welcome increase in the number of people, and especially children, walking and cycling in recent weeks. It is vital, therefore, that every measure possible is taken to make our roads safer for our citizens at this challenging time.

As Minister, you signed the Stockholm Declaration in February to reduce road deaths and stated that: "Every death on our roads is one too many". Resolution #11 of this Declaration focuses on speed management and mandates ‘a maximum road travel speed of 30 km/h in areas where vulnerable road users and vehicles mix in a frequent and planned manner’.

Brussels has announced a 20 km/h speed zone in its city core from May 1 to give residents more space during coronavirus. Other major cities have shut many roads to through traffic, and have repurposed the streets to make the environment safer for all vulnerable road users, as well as adding further protection in combating Covid-19.

You, as Minister, have made a number of important interventions to improve the safety of vulnerable road users. In these, the final days of the present government, there is an ideal opportunity to further protect our people during this Covid-19 outbreak.

In recognition of all of the above We ask you to consider the introduction of a 30 km/h speed limit on all urban roads. This could be achieved immediately via Ministerial Order under Section 4 of the Road Traffic Act 2004.

I look forward to your response, and would be happy to discuss these issues (remotely) with you at any stage. Yours sincerely, Mairéad Forsythe, Love 30 Campaign

 


 

Submissions

Love 30 made a number of submissions to public consultations during 2019, starting with one in June to Cork City Council on the Cork Metropolitan Area Draft Transport Strategy 2040 (CMATS).

In August, we made a submission to South Dublin County Council supporting periodic 30 km/h speed limits in the vicinity of six schools.

We made a submission to Dublin City Council in September, supporting the extension of 30 km/h speed limits to all residential areas within the City. These speed limits will come into effect on a phased basis during 2020. We are seeking to have 30 km/h speed limits extended to distributor roads and urban villages and to roads in the vicinity of schools.

In November, we made a submission supporting the initiative by Fingal County Council for ‘school streets’ in Malahide. This involves low speed limits and a part-time traffic ban outside the school.

Earlier in the year, Love 30 had contributed to submissions by Dublin Cycling Campaign on the NTA’s BusConnects programme.

The start of 2020 has been busy, with submissions made to Cork City Council, Galway County Council and Wexford County Council, with a submission to Fingal County Council in the works (more details here).

Velo-city Conference Dublin June 2019

In preparation for the Velo-city conference, we conducted a survey in Marino / Donnycarney to see if 30 km/h speed limits increased the numbers of people cycling, and the numbers of women cycling. No difference in declared number of cyclists but 44% said they cycled and 50 % of cyclists were female, compared to census figures of 18% and 30% respectively. The results of the survey were presented at Velo-city.

Other developments

Love 30 was nominated for the RSA Leading Lights Awards and was shortlisted in the sustainable transport category.

Free Speed Surveys conducted by the RSA showed poor observance of 30 km/h speed limits. Residential estates were better than some city centre roads, where 98% of motor vehicles exceeded 30 km/h limits.

Three people from Love 30 attended the 20’s Plenty conference in Waltham Forest, London on 31st October.

Galway Cycling Campaign want to campaign for more 30 km/h in the City, especially around schools, and a number of issues are emerging in County Galway.

The Government approved the Minister for Transport’s proposal for graduated speeding penalties, but many rural TDs oppose them.

Love 30 supported the foundation of the Irish Pedestrian Network.

Mairéad Forsythe was interviewed on radio by FM104 and Newstalk and featured on the RTÉ 1 TV Series about cycling, “Now You See Me”

 


 

The Love 30 campaign has made the attached submission to Galway County Council on the Draft Speed Limit Bye-Laws for Housing Estate Slow Zones.

The Love 30 Campaign strongly welcomes the proposals by Galway County Council to reduce speed limits in several residential estates.

However, we are disappointed at the limited number of residential estates in which 30 km/h speed limits will apply and that there are no proposals to introduce 30 km/h speed limits in the town and village centres, other residential roads, or outside schools. Further, we are disappointed that there have been no proposals to reduce speed limits or introduce traffic calming in bypassed towns and villages.

Love 30 recommends that the combined bye-laws be amended as follows:

  1. 30 km/h should be the default urban speed limit in all urban areas throughout Galway County, with exceptions for specific roads.
  2. 30 km/h should be introduced in all residential estates, other residential roads and the centres of towns and villages.
  3. Periodic 30 km/h zones should be implemented around all schools and other places of assembly (cinemas, theatres, community centres, religious buildings, etc.), that have large numbers of people arriving and / or departing at the same time.
  4. These speed limit changes should also apply to roads in new housing estates that have not yet been taken in charge.

 


 

Fingal County Council have published draft speed limit bye-laws at t https://consult.fingal.ie/browse for public consultation. You can made a submission with comments here up to the 20 March 2020.

The Love 30 campaign will be making a submission. If you would like to help with this contact info@love30.ie.

 


 

The Love 30 Campaign group is doing a survey to find out the impact of 30 km/h speed limits on cycling patterns. Do more people cycle as a result of lower speed limits? And does it lead to greater diversity among those who cycle? The results of the survey will be presented at Velo-City, the premier international planning conferences on cycling, which takes place from 25-28 June 2019 in Dublin.

If you live in Dublin, please fill in the Cycling and 30km/h Speed Limits Survey, by Friday 31 May. The survey is anonymous and takes less than 5 minutes to complete.

We are interested in hearing from cyclists and non-cyclists, and particularly people who live in Marino and Donnycarney, two of the first areas in Dublin to get 30 km/h speed limits.

 


 

Love 30 wishes all our supporters a happy and safe New Year. Here’s a short review of 2017.

We were delighted to see the introduction of widespread 30 km/h speed limits in the Dublin area, which will make these areas safer, quieter and encourage more people to walk and cycle.

Love 30 made submissions supporting proposals for 30 km/h speed limits in some residential estates in Offaly, Roscommon, Mayo, Cavan, Sligo, Laois, Cork City, Galway City, and Fingal.

Speed was the focus of the UN Global Road Safety Week on 8-12 May. Love 30 organised a number of events, centred on a Slow Down Day on 9th May.

Love 30 continued to work with An Taisce’s Green-Schools programme. Green Schools had an Awareness Day at Culmullen National School, Co. Meath and they have produced posters and stickers for distribution to schools,

The RSA Academic Lecture for the launch of Road Safety Week on 2 October was devoted to the introduction of 30 km/h limits in urban areas. Rod King of UK’s 20’s Plenty spoke as did Dermot Stevenson of Dublin City Council.

We will continue to campaign for 30 km/h speed limits on residential and urban streets and anywhere people walk and cycle. And we will be monitoring the effectiveness of the lower speed limits in the new 30 km/h areas.

 


 

Launch of UN Global Road Safety Week

Monday 8th May 10.00 Pearse St. Outside the Trinity Science Gallery Press briefing and photos. Gardai will be doing speed checks

Slow Down Day - Tuesday 9th May

11-12am Phibsborough, junction of Phibsboro Road and Monck Place. Gardai will be doing speed checks and Love 30 will be asking people why slowing down would benefit area.

12.30pm-1.30pm Publicity event at Dáil Ask TDs and Senators who support 30 km/h speed limits to write messages to Save Lives #SlowDown’.

https://www.unroadsafetyweek.org/en/get-involved

 


 

April 2nd saw over 500 cyclists taking over Dublin's quays for a family-friendly cycle to show support for the planned 4.6km cycle path between the Phoenix Park and the Point Village.

A stream of cyclists left Wellington Monument in the Phoenix Park and flowed down along the Liffey to the Point Village.

The event was run by Dublin Cycling Campaign and supported by Love 30, we got some Love 30 flags made up for the day, to celebrate Dublin city council's launch of a 30 km/h limit on most roads within Dublin's canals a few days previously.

 


 

Road collisions are the biggest killer of young people aged 15-29 worldwide. The 4th UN Road Safety Week takes place from the 8 to 14 May 2017 will focus on speed and how slowing down can save lives. Their website has tips for running events and getting people involved and a 'Slow down day's toolkit.

Click here for more details on UN Road Safety Week

Their theme is: Slow down #Savelives

 


 

Slower speeds save lives, save lifestyles and save money.

That was the message from the 20’s Plenty Conference that took place on the 8th March 2017 in Birmingham. Mairead Forsythe and Muireann O’Dea attended the conference on behalf of the Love 30 Campaign and Cyclist.ie.

Dublin was well represented as Roy O’Connor from Dublin City Council presented the plans to expand the 30kmh zones in the city over the next few months. On the 1st April 2017 the speed limit will be set to 30km/h on nearly all roads within the canals. In July 2017 further residential areas outside of the canals will be added. The council have done baseline measurements of air, noise and speeds so it will be possible to measure the benefits after the new limits are introduced. They also measured journey times for cars travelling at 50km/h and 30km/h across the canal area and found that the lower speed limit adds less than a minute to journeys of 2.5km.

Widespread 20mp/h speed limits have been introduced in Calderdale over a three year period from 2015 to 2017. While the average reduction in vehicle speeds has only been 2.2 miles/hour there has been a reduction of 22% in road traffic collisions. Paul Butcher, the director of Public Health at Calderdale Council, estimates the savings so far from the reduction in injuries at £450,000 and he expects the full costs of the speed limits programme to be recouped within 5 years.

The hosts, Birmingham City Council, were keen to showcase their programmes to make the roads safer and to encourage active travel. The council were awarded £58 million from the Department for Transport to implement their Cycle Revolution programme to promote cycling. They have a team of 9 that run cycling events throughout the city for people of all ages and abilities. Some of the innovative ideas were to give away 3,500 bicycles to people who can’t afford a bicycle and to introduce a Brompton bike hire scheme.

The council have also introduced a scheme whereby motorists caught speeding outside a school are given the option of paying the speeding fine or appearing before a Children’s Court where they must explain their behaviour. You can get an idea of how it works from these Children’s Court videos. Rod King MBE, the founder of 20’s Plenty for Us, spoke of the difficulties faced by residents in The overall message from the conference was that lower speed limits are now becoming the norm throughout cities in the UK, and that they are a cost effective way to reduce injuries and promote active travel.

 


 

South Dublin has adopted revised Bye-Laws introducing 30 km/h in most residential estates. Signs are now being erected and the new limits should become law in Spring/Summer 2017.  

 


 

Love 30 made a submission to Cork County Council's public consultation on amendments to the speed limit bye laws, including lowering speeds to 30 km/h in a small number of residential estates. We supported the proposed 30 km/h limits in a small number of residential estates, and outside a school in Youghal and we urged Cork County Council to introduce more 30 km/h limits in residential estates, in towns and villages and outside schools.

Love 30 made a submission to Mayo County Council's public consultation on amendments to the speed limit bye laws, including lowering speeds to 30 km/h in a small number of residential estates. We supported the proposed 30 km/h limits in some residential estates and we urged Mayo County Council to introduce more 30 km/h limits in residential estates, in towns and villages and outside schools.

Love 30 made a submission to Galway County Council's public consultation on introducing 30 km/h speed limits in some residential estates. We supported the proposed 30 km/h limits in some residential estates and urged Galway County Council to introduce more 30 km/h limits in residential estates, in towns and villages and outside schools.

Love 30 made a submission in response to Offaly County Council's proposals for 30 km/h speed limits in all residential estates. We welcomed the decision to include all residential estates in their 30 km/h proposals. However we expressed our disappointment that there are no proposals to introduce 30 km/h speed limits in town and village centres, or outside schools. We urged the Council to do its utmost to continue the process of lowering speed limits in the County with the least possible delay.

Love 30 made a submission in response to Roscommon County Council's proposals for 30 km/h speed limits on some residential roads. We welcomed the proposals to introduce 30 km/h speed limits in many residential estates. However we expressed our disappointment that there are no proposals to introduce 30 km/h speed limits in town and village centres, or outside schools. We urged the Council to do its utmost to continue the process of lowering speed limits in the County with the least possible delay.   For more information on existing bye-laws and proposals to introduce new 30 km/h limits click on [read more on speed limits here]

 


 

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Dublin: At its meeting on 5th December 2016 Dublin City Council adopted proposals to introduce 30 km/h speed limits for most roads "within the Canals" on 31 March and to introduce 30 km/h in residential estates in a numbers of suburbs later in the year. Love 30 is delighted with Dublin City Council's decision. We are particularly pleased that it includes the area within the Canals, which is one of the aims in the Love 30 Vision Statement. We are also pleased that Dublin City Council is introducing 30 km/h in the City Centre and is not confining it to residential estates. We are disappointed that the distributor roads remain at 50 km/h. you can see the map of the new limits on this link.

 


 

Wednesday, March 8, 2017 Dublin: At its meeting on 5th December 2016 Dublin City Council adopted proposals to introduce 30 km/h speed limits for most roads "within the Canals" on 31 March and to introduce 30 km/h in residential estates in a numbers of suburbs later in the year. Love 30 is delighted with Dublin City Council's decision. We are particularly pleased that it includes the area within the Canals, which is one of the aims in the Love 30 Vision Statement. We are also pleased that Dublin City Council is introducing 30 km/h in the City Centre and is not confining it to residential estates.

We are disappointed that the distributor roads remain at 50 km/h. you can see the map of the new limits on this link: 30KP Speed Limit Review-01.06.2016   South Dublin 30 km/h in residential estates

South Dublin has adopted revised Bye-Laws introducing 30 km/h in most residential estates. Signs are now being erected and the new limits should become law in Spring/Summer 2017.

Love 30 made a submission to Cork County Council's public consultation on amendments to the speed limit bye laws, including lowering speeds to 30 km/h in a small number of residential estates. We supported the proposed 30 km/h limits in a small number of residential estates, and outside a school in Youghal and we urged Cork County Council to introduce more 30 km/h limits in residential estates, in towns and villages and outside schools.

Love 30 made a submission to Mayo County Council's public consultation on amendments to the speed limit bye laws, including lowering speeds to 30 km/h in a small number of residential estates. We supported the proposed 30 km/h limits in some residential estates and we urged Mayo County Council to introduce more 30 km/h limits in residential estates, in towns and villages and outside schools.

Love 30 made a submission to Galway County Council's public consultation on introducing 30 km/h speed limits in some residential estates. We supported the proposed 30 km/h limits in some residential estates and urged Galway County Council to introduce more 30 km/h limits in residential estates, in towns and villages and outside schools.

Love 30 made a submission in response to Offaly County Council's proposals for 30 km/h speed limits in all residential estates. We welcomed the decision to include all residential estates in their 30 km/h proposals. However we expressed our disappointment that there are no proposals to introduce 30 km/h speed limits in town and village centres, or outside schools.We urged the Council to do its utmost to continue the process of lowering speed limits in the County with the least possible delay.

Love 30 made a submission in response to Roscommon County Council's proposals for 30 km/h speed limits on some residential roads. We welcomed the proposals to introduce 30 km/h speed limits in many residential estates. However we expressed our disappointment that there are no proposals to introduce 30 km/h speed limits in town and village centres, or outside schools. We urged the Council to do its utmost to continue the process of lowering speed limits in the County with the least possible delay.

For more information on existing bye-laws and proposals to introduce new 30 km/h limits click on www.speedlimits.ie

 


 

** The Love 30 Campaign today welcomes Dublin City Council’s implementation of a 30 km/h speed limit on most roads within Dublin's canals. **

In a year which has already seen 5 cyclists killed on our roads, it is more urgent than ever that our roads become safe for everybody; the introduction of a 30 km/h speed limit is a welcome step in the right direction.

“It’s great to see Dublin City Council leading the way towards safer streets,” said Mairead Forsythe from Love 30. “This brings us more into line with the rest of Europe where 30 km/h is becoming the default urban speed limit.”

There is overwhelming evidence that lower speed limits make streets safer and more pleasant places for children and adults to live, socialise, work and play. Road Safety Authority statistics show that lower speeds dramatically reduce the number of people killed in collisions: 1 in 10 pedestrians will die when hit by a car at 30 km/h; at 50 km/h, 5 people in 10 will die, and at 60 km/h, 9 out of 10 pedestrians will die.

The Love 30 Campaign calls on Dublin City Council to follow this important step today with the introduction of 30 km/h in all residential estates and urban villages and to reconsider the speed limit ondistributor roads which are still 50 km/h.

Love 30 also calls on other local authorities to accelerate the introduction of 30 km/h limits in residential estates and to introduce 30 km/h limits in the centre of towns and villages, as well as outside schools.

Note for editors:

The Love 30 Campaign is a campaigning group supported by various organisations, including the European Network for 30 km/h, An Taisce, Reimagining Phibsborough, Dublin Cycling Campaign, Green-Schools, and Jake’s Legacy.

Some examples of the benefits of setting lower speed limits in other locations:

•50% fewer road crashes (Switzerland)

•90% fewer killed or severely injured (Kingston upon Hull)

•50% fewer children killed or severely injured (London)

 


 

The Irish Times had pretty positive coverage of the new speed limits which have just been introduced within the canals of Dublin. Love 30 wins the day!

 


 

Road collisions are the biggest killer of young people aged 15-29 worldwide.

The 4th UN Road Safety Week takes place from the 8 to 14 May 2017 will focus on speed and how slowing down can save lives.

Their website has tips for running events and getting people involved and a 'Slow down day's toolkit.

Click here for more details on UN Road Safety Week

Their theme is: Slow down #Savelives

 


 

Slower speeds save lives, save lifestyles and save money.

That was the message from the 20’s Plenty Conference that took place on the 8th March 2017 in Birmingham. Mairead Forsythe and Muireann O’Dea attended the conference on behalf of the Love 30 Campaign and Cyclist.ie.

Dublin was well represented as Roy O’Connor from Dublin City Council presented the plans to expand the 30kmh zones in the city over the next few months. On the 1st April 2017 the speed limit will be set to 30km/h on nearly all roads within the canals. In July 2017 further residential areas outside of the canals will be added. The council have done baseline measurements of air, noise and speeds so it will be possible to measure the benefits after the new limits are introduced. They also measured journey times for cars travelling at 50km/h and 30km/h across the canal area and found that the lower speed limit adds less than a minute to journeys of 2.5km.

Widespread 20mp/h speed limits have been introduced in Calderdale over a three year period from 2015 to 2017. While the average reduction in vehicle speeds has only been 2.2 miles/hour there has been a reduction of 22% in road traffic collisions. Paul Butcher, the director of Public Health at Calderdale Council, estimates the savings so far from the reduction in injuries at £450,000 and he expects the full costs of the speed limits programme to be recouped within 5 years.

The hosts, Birmingham City Council, were keen to showcase their programmes to make the roads safer and to encourage active travel. The council were awarded £58 million from the Department for Transport to implement their Cycle Revolution programme to promote cycling. They have a team of 9 that run cycling events throughout the city for people of all ages and abilities. Some of the innovative ideas were to give away 3,500 bicycles to people who can’t afford a bicycle and to introduce a Brompton bike hire scheme.

The council have also introduced a scheme whereby motorists caught speeding outside a school are given the option of paying the speeding fine or appearing before a Children’s Court where they must explain their behaviour. You can get an idea of how it works from these Children’s Court videos. Rod King MBE, the founder of 20’s Plenty for Us, spoke of the difficulties faced by residents in

The overall message from the conference was that lower speed limits are now becoming the norm throughout cities in the UK, and that they are a cost effective way to reduce injuries and promote active travel.

 


 

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Dublin: At its meeting on 5th December 2016 Dublin City Council adopted proposals to introduce 30 km/h speed limits for most roads "within the Canals" on 31 March and to introduce 30 km/h in residential estates in a numbers of suburbs later in the year. Love 30 is delighted with Dublin City Council's decision. We are particularly pleased that it includes the area within the Canals, which is one of the aims in the Love 30 Vision Statement. We are also pleased that Dublin City Council is introducing 30 km/h in the City Centre and is not confining it to residential estates. We disappointed that the distributor roads remain at 50 km/h. you can see the map of the new limits on this link: 30KP Speed Limit Review-01.06.2016

 


 

South Dublin has adopted revised Bye-Laws introducing 30 km/h in most residential estates. Signs are now being erected and the new limits should become law in Spring/Summer 2017.

 


 

Love 30 made a submission to Cork County Council's public consultation on amendments to the speed limit bye laws, including lowering speeds to 30 km/h in a small number of residential estates. We supported the proposed 30 km/h limits in a small number of residential estates, and outside a school in Youghal and we urged Cork County Council to introduce more 30 km/h limits in residential estates, in towns and villages and outside schools. See the full submission

Love 30 made a submission to Mayo County Council's public consultation on amendments to the speed limit bye laws, including lowering speeds to 30 km/h in a small number of residential estates. We supported the proposed 30 km/h limits in some residential estates and we urged Mayo County Council to introduce more 30 km/h limits in residential estates, in towns and villages and outside schools. See the full submission

Love 30 made a submission to **********Galway County Council's********* public consultation on introducing 30 km/h speed limits in some residential estates. We supported the proposed 30 km/h limits in some residential estates and urged Galway County Council to introduce more 30 km/h limits in residential estates, in towns and villages and outside schools. See our full submission here

For more information on existing bye-laws and proposals to introduce new 30 km/h limits click on www.speedlimits.ie

Love 30 made a submission in response to ******Offaly County Council's****** proposals for 30 km/h speed limits in all residential estates. We welcomed the decision to include all residential estates in their 30 km/h proposals. However we expressed our disappointment that there are no proposals to introduce 30 km/h speed limits in town and village centres, or outside schools.We urged the Council to do its utmost to continue the process of lowering speed limits in the County with the least possible delay.

Love 30 made a submission in response to **Roscommon County Council's **proposals for 30 km/h speed limits on some residential roads. We welcomed the proposals to introduce 30 km/h speed limits in many residential estates. However we expressed our disappointment that there are no proposals to introduce 30 km/h speed limits in town and village centres, or outside schools. We urged the Council to do its utmost to continue the process of lowering speed limits in the County with the least possible delay.

 


 

For immediate use, Dublin, 8 May 2017
Today marks the start of the UN’s Global Road Safety Week. All around the world, communities are coming together to organise events focused around the theme ‘Save Lives #SlowDown.’ "Speed is at the core of the global road traffic injury problem," notes WHO Director-General Dr Margaret Chan. "If countries were to address just this key risk, they would soon reap the rewards of safer roads, both in terms of lives saved and increases in walking and cycling, with profound and lasting effects on health."

54 people have been killed on Irish roads in 2017 already, of whom 21 were vulnerable road users (pedestrians, cyclists, motor cyclists and pillion passengers). Approximately one third of all these accident fatalities are speed related. Drivers need to make the pledge and act to Save Lives #SlowDown.
This week will see the Garda Traffic Corps out in force, carrying out extra speed checks around Dublin. Love 30 will be holding a series of events on the 9th of May, asking drivers to make the pledge to ‘Save Lives #SlowDown.’ At 8.15am schoolchildren from Scoil Chaitríona on Mobhi Road will be out giving drivers their views on why they should slow down. At 11 am on Tuesday 9th May, Love 30 and the Garda Traffic Corps will be Monck Place, a known ‘rat run’ in Phibsboro, asking drivers to make the pledge to ‘Save Lives #SlowDown’. At 1pm on Tuesday 9th May, a cross-party Oireachtas group of cycling TDs and Senators will be showing their support for this campaign at the Leinster House gates on Kildare Street.
Welcoming the initiative, Inspector Ronan Barry of the Garda Traffic Corps called on everyone to take part this week. “Slowing down isn’t just for UN Global Road Safety Week,” he said. “We all need to take responsibility for saving lives on our roads.”
Love 30 is a coalition of cycling and community groups who campaign for lower speed limits to make our towns and cities safer and more pleasant places to live, work and play. “We are one group out of thousands of groups, all around the world, calling on drivers to slow down,” says Love 30’s Mairéad Forsythe. “We must accept that speed is a critical factor leading to deaths on our roads and change our behaviour accordingly.”
Dublin Cycling Campaign are also supporting this intiative. “In Dublin alone 3 cyclists have been killed off their bikes this year already,” said Colm Ryder of the Dublin Cycling Campaign. “It is a frightening situation that cannot continue. We are delighted that An Garda Síochána are carrying out these urban speed checks.”

Contact: Love 30, Mairéad Forsythe on 086-8337577 for more details

NOTE TO EDITORS:
UN Global Road Safety Week: 8 - 14 May 2017: The #SlowDown campaign operates on the principles of the Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020. On 11 May 2011, dozens of countries around the world kicked off the first global Decade of Action. From New Zealand to Mexico and the Russian Federation to South Africa, governments committed to taking new steps to save lives on their roads. The Decade of Action seeks to prevent road traffic deaths and injuries which experts project will take the lives of 1.9 million people annually by 2020.
The Global Plan for the Decade of Action outlines steps towards improving the safety of roads and vehicles; enhancing emergency services; and building up road safety management generally. It also calls for increased legislation and enforcement on speeding.
For more information see www.unroadsafetyweek.org.
Love 30: Ireland has already seen 6 cyclists die on our roads this year, 3 of them in Dublin. Approximately one third of all accident fatalities are speed related. Drivers need to be cognizant of their speed levels and potential to kill or maim vulnerable road users (VRUs), particularly in urban areas. The Love 30 Campaign strongly supports the introduction of a 30 km/h speed limit on many roads in Irish towns and cities and, together with the Garda Traffic Corps, is supporting the UN’s Global Road Safety week with daily speed checks throughout the week across Dublin. For more information: www.love30.ie